Venezuela and a new President, maybe new generators are also needed?

As you have likely heard, Venezuela has voted for, and subsequently elected a new president. As the country is going through a transition after the death of long time leader, Hugo Chavez, there is a new president that has been elected to office. Nicolas Maduro was recently sworn in after squeaking out a narrow victory leading some to demand an audit and recount of the election. Regardless of the fate that the President and government of Venezuela ends up with, a shift of power is undoubtedly taking place in the country after Chavez's death, which directly relates to energy generation.

Strides In Energy Generation

Before Chavez's death, he stated that during the last decade or so (1999-2011), Venezuela doubled its energy generation capacity. What's more, it has also been reported that in the decade preceding that time, only just over 3,000 megawatts were added to the country's power grid, which as mentioned, is about half as much as was added in the time since. Beyond the clams and promises by the government in relation to its energy generation, there is a need for diesel generators, portable in some cases, to power remote, yet essential areas of the country. As a first-world country it is very easy for us to lose sight of how undeveloped areas of a country such a Venezuela, can suffer in terms of energy production. While it may be farfetched to think the entire country of Venezuela can run of generators, diesel or any other kind, however, the backup power source can provide undeniable assistance to aid the country in supplying power to its various regions.

Why Generators?

The reason that portable generators can prove to be so vital to Venezuelans is that they provide a portable energy supply that is substantial enough to power facilities that communities throughout the country rely so heavily on. Whether the new president of the country makes continued energy production gains a staple of his administration is unclear; regardless, there will likely be pressure from constituents, as well as other countries to stay on pace, or perhaps even exceed the energy generation capacity that Chavez achieved.

The Need For A Long-Term Plan With Short-Term Capabilities

It is my opinion that as Venezuela continues to develop its energy infrastructure, it will undoubtedly take time to do so. As the country continues to increase its energy production capabilities, it will surely need other power resources to rely on in the meantime. This likely means temporary and portable power will be needed until more permanent energy resources can be solidified in various parts of the country. Up until now, seldom has such been done to secure proper energy capabilities. This is why the country needs a long-term plan with short-term capabilities to hold its energy production needs over until that plan can be completed. The way I see it, the best way of doing so is for the country to provide portable and ample generators to underdeveloped regions of the country in order to provide sufficient power to villages and community facilities, along with other resources that are so badly needed.

I am sure we can all agree that Venezuela is going through a tough transition right now. The socialist leader, Hugo Chavez, died only a short time after gaining reelection, and now there seems to be a question as to whether the newly elected President Maduro actually won the election. As the government sifts through all of the controversy, the country’s need for adequate power is still a primarily issue at hand. A lot remains to be seen in Venezuela, but at least for the time being, the country should consider using generators to supply energy to areas that need it most.

 

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Sunday, 18 November 2018
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