Tips on Positioning Your Business for Sale

positioning-your-business-for-sale

Owners of growing companies typically have two paths to liquidity - either offering shares to the public through an IPO (initial public offering) or a sale of the company. Here are some tips on positioning your business for sale:


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Entrepreneurs should begin positioning their companies for an exit early in the life of their businesses and should continue to take steps toward that strategy throughout their businesses' life. Here are some tips on positioning your business for sale:

Build a great company

Put all your efforts behind building a great company, one with an industry-leading product or service. There is no better way to extract the maximum value from a seller for your business than to have a superb company.

Recruit the best you can afford

Most acquirers have much more experience buying businesses than owners have selling businesses. Surround yourself with experienced people who can help. Bring on board members or advisors who know your industry, know the potential acquirers, and understand how to do transactions. Talk to people who have sold businesses in your industry in the past and ask them for advice.

Recommended reading: 13 Key Questions to Ask for Growth by Acquisition

Put yourself in the buyer's shoes

This is especially important if you are selling a business for the first time. Think about what your potential buyer wants from your business. If you were that buyer, what would you be looking for?

Know your buyers

Every business has multiple potential buyers. However, it's often the case that a business owner falls in love with the first buyer that makes a pass. If you know the potential buyers for your business, you'll be able to quickly react when you are approached. Optimally, you'll have a personal relationship with the owners and management of your potential buyers and will be able to reach out to them to see if they have any interest in discussing an acquisition when other buyers approach you.

If none of your competitors know about you, it's difficult to create a competitive situation if you are approached about an acquisition. In contrast, if you are well known as a leader in your industry, once it is known that a buyer has approached you, you will be in a good position to generate additional interest in your company.
Know what you want to do

When you find yourself in a position in which you can potentially sell your business, know what you want.

Most business owners haven't put a lot of time into thinking what they want to get out of a sale. The financial aspects of a deal are merely a small part of the overall transaction - don't overlook the emotional, organizational, and functional aspects. When approached by a seller, don't vacillate - be clear about what you want and negotiate hard for it. If you don't know what you want, it's likely that a sophisticated seller will be able to sense this and take advantage of the situation.

Know what you want to do

When you find yourself in a position in which you can potentially sell your business, know what you want. Most business owners haven't put a lot of time into thinking what they want to get out of a sale. The financial aspects of a deal are merely a small part of the overall transaction - don't overlook the emotional, organizational, and functional aspects.

When approached by a seller, don't vacillate - be clear about what you want and negotiate hard for it. If you don't know what you want, it's likely that a sophisticated seller will be able to sense this and take advantage of the situation.

Be clear and honest with your team

You need to carefully choose the right time to tell your team about the potential sale. However, once you tell them, make sure you are honest, clear, and consistent with your message. Assume everyone will know everything about the deal - even small "falsehoods" or "omissions" can come back to haunt you. This doesn't mean you have to tell every person in the company every detail - decide what you are going to share and then be consistent.

Don't be a seller, but always be prepared to sell your company

Always be ready to be approached. If you can't answer the question, "What do you want for your company," spend some time thinking about it.

Over to you now. Have you sold a business? How did you go about positioning your business for sale? Tell us in the comments below.

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